by Cameron Coil and Jules Ross - Edit
external image Stalingrad_aftermath.jpg


The Battle of Stalingrad (September 1942- February 1943) is considered to have been the turning point in WW2. It caused the Germans to lose there best army and put them on the defensive. It allowed the allies to start there march for liberation and eventually defeat Nazi Germany brining an end to WW2.


The Start of The Battle of Stalingrad
On September 3, 1942, the German Sixth Army (Hitlers best army) reached the outskirts of Stalingrad, expecting to take the city quickly. But the Russians had built up their defenses and continued to bring in reinforcements. A general, V. I. Chuikov, took command of the main defending force, the Sixty-second Army, while Marshal Georgii K. Zhukov, Soviet Russia's greatest general, planned a counteroffensive in order to save the city.

In subsequent days the invaders fought their way into Stalingrad against fierce resistance. This was urban street fighting of the most bitter sort, occasioning tremendous losses on both sides. The blasted ruins of houses and factories began to stink as hot winds carried the smell of decaying corpses into every nook and cranny. By late September the Germans could raise the swastika flag over the Univermag department store in the center of town, but they could not dislodge the Russians from the sprawling industrial quarters along the Volga.

Generals:
German Army
Name
Rank
Unit



Wilhelm Adam
Oberst
IIa AOK 6



Günther Angern
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 16. Panzerdivision



Hans-Adolf von Arenstorff
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 60. Infanteriedivision (mot.)



Karl Arndt
Generalarzt
Korpsarzt LI. Armeekorps



Johannes Bässler
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 14. Panzerdivision



Friedrich Freiherr von Broich
Oberst
Kommandeur Panzergrenadier-Brigade 24



Georg Brombierstäudl
Wehrmachtdekan
IVd AOK 6



Bruno Chrobek
Generalmajor
Kommandeur Infanterieregiment 672



Siegfried Conradi
Generalmajor
Arko 6



Albrecht Czimatis
Oberst
Kommandeur 305. Infanteriedivision



Alexander Edler von Daniels
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 376. Infanteriedivision



Heinrich-Anton Deboi
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 44. Infanteriedivision



Otto Deßloch
General der Flakartillerie
Kommandierender General I. Flakkorps



Moritz von Drebber
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 297. Infanteriedivision



Maximilian Reichsfreiherr von Edelsheim
Oberst
Kommandeur Panzergrenadier-Brigade 24



Friedrich Fangohr
Generalmajor
Chef des Generalstabes 4. Panzerarmee



Martin Fiebig
Generalleutnant
Kommandierender General VIII. Fliegerkorps



Max Fremerey
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 29. Infanteriedivision (mot.)



Eccard Freiherr von Gablenz
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 384. Infanteriedivision



Otto Geuther
Wehrmachtoberpfarrer
IVd AOK 6



Erich Grosse
Generalmajor
Kommandeur Grenadierregiment 276



Walter Hanspach
Generalarzt
Korpsarzt XIV. Armeekorps



Alexander von Hartmann
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 71. Infanteriedivision



Bruno Ritter von Hauenschild
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 24. Panzerdivision



Ferdinand Heim
Generalleutnant
Kommandierender General XXXXVII. Panzerkorps



Walter Heitz
Generaloberst
Kommandierender General VIII. Armeekorps



Karl-Adolf Hollidt
General der Infanterie
Kommandierender General Armee-Abteilung Hollidt



Hermann Hoth
Generaloberst
Oberbefehlshaber 4. Panzerarmee



Hans-Valentin Hube
General der Panzertruppen
Kommandierender General XIV. Panzerkorps



Erwin Jaenecke
General der Pioniere
Kommandierender General IV. Armeekorps



Hermann Kayser
Oberstarzt
Korpsarzt IV. Armeekorps



Werner Kempf
General der Panzertruppen
Kommandierender General XXXXVIII. Panzerkorps



Walther Kittel
Generalstabsarzt
Heeresgruppenarzt Heeresgruppe Don



Otto Kohlermann
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 60. Infanteriedivision (mot.)



Otto Korfes
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 295. Infanteriedivision



Willibald Freiherr von Langermann und Erlenkamp
General der Panzertruppen
Kommandierender General XXIV. Panzerkorps



Willy Langkeit
Oberstleutnant
Kommandeur Panzerregiment 36



Martin Lattmann
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 389. Infanteriedivision



Wilhelm von Lengerke
Generalmajor
Kommandeur Panzergrenadier-Regiment 21



Arno von Lenski
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 24. Panzerdivision



Richard Lepper
Generalmajor
Arko 6



Hans-Georg Leyser
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 29. Infanteriedivision (mot.)



Erich von Manstein
Generalfeldmarschall
Oberbefehlshaber Heeresgruppe Don



Erhard Milch
Generalfeldmarschall
Oberbefehlshaber Kessel Stalingrad



Siegfried Müller (Oberstartzt)
Oberstarzt
Korpsarzt VIII. Armeekorps



Kurt Oppenländer
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 305. Infanteriedivision



Friedrich Paulus
Generalfeldmarschall
Oberbefehlshaber 6. Armee



Max Pfeffer
General der Artillerie
Kommandierender General IV. Armeekorps



Georg Pfeiffer
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 94. Infanteriedivision



Wolfgang Pickert
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 9. Flakdivision (mot.)



Otto Renoldi
Generalstabsarzt
Armee-Arzt 6. Armee



Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen
Generaloberst
Oberbefehlshaber Luftflotte 4



Gustav-Adolf Riebel
Generalmajor
Kommandeur Panzerregiment 24



Hans Ringe
Oberst
Feldkommandant 343



Carl Rodenburg
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 76. Infanteriedivision



Werner Sanne
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 100. Jägerdivision



Helmuth Schlömer
Generalleutnant
Kommandierender General XIV. Panzerkorps



Arthur Schmidt
Generalleutnant
Chef des Generalstabes 6. Armee



Friedrich Schulz
Generalmajor
Chef des Generalstabes Heeresgruppe Don



Viktor von Schwedler
General der Infanterie
Kommandierender General IV. Armeekorps



Richard Graf von Schwerin
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 79. Infanteriedivision



Walther von Seydlitz-Kurzbach
General der Artillerie
Kommandierender General LI. Armeekorps



Heinrich Smend
Generalarzt
Korpsarzt XIV. Panzerkorps



Georg von Sodenstern
General der Infanterie
Chef des Generalstabes Heeresgruppe B



Hans Spiegelberg
Oberstarzt
Korpsarzt XI. Armeekorps



Richard Stempel
Generalleutnant
Kommandeur 371. Infanteriedivision



Karl Strecker
Generalleutnant
Kommandierender General XI. Armeekorps



Maximilian Reichsfreiherr von Weichs
Generalfeldmarschall
Oberbefehlshaber Heeresgruppe B



Walther Wenck
Oberst
Chef des Generalstabes Armee-Abteilung Hollidt



Gustav Anton von Wietersheim
General der Infanterie
Kommandierender General XIV. Panzerkorps



Rolf Wuthmann
Generalmajor
Kommandeur 295. Infanteriedivision



Soviet Red Army
Name
rank
unit
Georgy Zhukov
Marshall
Commander Red Army
Konstantin Rokossovsky
General
Commander Don Front
Filipp Golikov
Colonel General
Co-Commander Stalingrad Front
Fyodor Tolbukhin
General
Commander 57th Army
Vasily Chuikov
General
Commander 62nd Army
Aleksandr Vasilevsky
General
Commander-in-Chief
Nikolai Fyodorovich Vatutin
General
Commander Southwest Front
Nikolai Voronov
Chief Marshal of Artillery
Commander of Artillery
Vasili Zaitsev
Captain
Sniper
Romanian
Name
rank
unit
Constantin Constantinescu-Claps
General
Commander 4th Romanian army
Petre Dumitrescu
General
Commander 3rd Romanian army
(List taken directly from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_officers_and_commanders_in_the_Battle_of_Stalingrad )

Initial Troops:

Axis:
270,000 men
3,000 artillery pieces
500 tanks
600 aircraft, 1,600 by mid-September

USSR:
187,000 men
2,200 artillery pieces
400 tanks
300 aircraft

Turning Point
external image Zhukov.jpg


In mid-November, the Nazis were still trying to take control of Stalingrad. Soviet General Zhukov (as seen above) launched his offensive to ambush the army. At this point the Germans could have fought their way out, but Hitler ordered them to hold their until death. Winter began to set in and temperatures dropped and food, ammunition, and heat were all in short supply. Nazi Field Marshal Erich von Manstein attempted a rescue mission, but it was halted short of its goal, and the freezing and starving Germans in Stalingrad were forbidden to try to reach their would-be rescuers. On February 2, 1943, Nazi General Paulus surrendered what remained of his army-some 91,000 men. About 150,000 Germans were killed in the fighting.



Significance
external image The-battle-of-stalingrad-generals-at-war.jpg

Casualties:

Axis:
850,000 killed, missing or wounded

USSR:
1,150,000 killed, missing or wounded


The victory of the Battle of Stalingrad was essential for the allies because it would determine if they would begin there march for liberation or keep fighting . If Hitlers men were victorious the Nazis would gain much needed supplies giving them a key foothold, allowing them to rebuild and prepare for further push back. The allied victory marked the Nazis first major defeat and failure of blitzkrieg. For the first time Germany was now on the defensive giving the allies the advantage. With the Germans having to defend two fronts, the allies would have the advantage. The victory of the Battle of Stalingrad opened up the second front as Germany was now being pushed back from the East and West. The Battle of Stalingrad was an essential in opening another front against Germany, and it marked the beginning of the end for the defeat of the Nazis.


Video on Battle of Stalingrad






Sources


http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/battle_of_stalingrad.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad
http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_stalingrad.html
http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwi/stalingrad/default.aspx